Events Calendar

Nov
8
Thu
2012
Nomadic Life Styles and Narratives in Kazakhstan: Then and Now @ Lindner Commons
Nov 8 @ 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Nomadic Life Styles and Narratives in Kazakhstan: Then and Now @ Lindner Commons

A workshop held in conjunction with the exhibition Nomads and Networks: The Ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan” currently at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in the Smithsonian Institution until December 2, 2012.

Nomadism has been a key aspect of culture in the Eurasian space, especially on the Kazakh steppes, throughout the centuries. The Russian colonization and the Soviet Union drastically transformed the Kazakh society in the 19th and 20th century. Since independence in 1991, the legacy of nomadism has been rehabilitated by the political authorities in their nation building schemes.

The society has also participated in reconstructing symbols of the nomadic past: they have become objects of memory and research, but also objects of artistic inspiration, and commercial branding. This workshop invites a team of experts to discuss the contemporary use of the concept of nomadism from various angles.

Dec
6
Thu
2012
Central Asia’s Struggle with Religion @ Voesar Conference Room
Dec 6 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Central Asia's Struggle with Religion @ Voesar Conference Room

with Catherine Cosman, Senior Policy Analyst- U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom        

Central Asian governments use state-controlled Islam to build national identity, but also fear Islam’s influence and understand that Islam has greater mobilization potential than any other institution in their societies.  In the early 1990’s, there was fairly free access to various religious influences and the popularity of Islam and other religions increased rapidly. Today, however, Central Asian religion laws include: severe restrictions on religious education; strict limits or bans on children attending religious services; censorship and limits on religious literature; severe limits and controls on places of worship; bans on unregistered religious activity; restrictions on foreign influence, and difficult registration regulations.  Central Asian governments also attempt to control religion via government-controlled structures, including religious affairs committees and state-controlled religious bodies.Central Asian states have also have adopted wide-ranging policies to combat extremism, particularly the prosecution of alleged members of officially banned groups rather than proven involvement in violent acts.
 
Catherine Cosman is senior policy analyst at the U.S. Commission on International ReligiousFreedom. Her areas of responsibility include the countries of the former Soviet Union, East andCentral Europe, and Western Europe.
Dec
17
Mon
2012
Kyrgyzstan Beyond ‘Democracy Island’ and ‘Failing State’: Factoring Social and Political Changes in a Post-Soviet Society @ Uppsala Universitet
Dec 17 @ 9:30 AM – Dec 18 @ 5:00 PM
Kyrgyzstan Beyond 'Democracy Island' and 'Failing State': Factoring Social and Political Changes in a Post-Soviet Society @ Uppsala Universitet

An international conference organized by the Central Asia Program and the Uppsala Center for Russian Studies.

Kyrgyzstan Beyond ‘Democracy Island’ and ‘Failing State’: Factoring Social and Political Changes in a Post-Soviet Society

Jan
8
Tue
2013
Diversification of an Energy-Producing Economy Agricultural Policy in Kazakhstan @ Conference Room 505
Jan 8 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Diversification of an Energy-Producing Economy Agricultural Policy in Kazakhstan @ Conference Room 505

with Richard Pomfret, Professor of Economics, University of Adelaide, Australia

Kazakhstan has used energy revenues to save for the future, invest in human capital, and diversify the structure of production with the goal of becoming one of the “fifty most competitive, dynamically developing countries in the world”. Agriculture has been a key part of the diversification strategy ever since the government committed a billion dollars to the 2003-5 Agriculture and Food Program. Since then agricultural policy has passed through several phases, mirroring evolving attitudes in Kazakhstan towards the role of government and of the market in economic development. This seminar analyses the content and consequences of agricultural policy, and agriculture’s role in Kazakhstan’s economic transformation.

Richard Pomfret, Professor of Economics at the University of Adelaide, Australia, and adviser to the Australian government and to international organizations such as the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, United Nations Development Programme, and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Feb
19
Tue
2013
European and U.S. policies in Central Asia: Will transatlantic cooperation work in Central Asia towards and beyond 2014? @ Permanent Representation of the Republic of Poland to the European Union
Feb 19 @ 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
European and U.S. policies in Central Asia: Will transatlantic cooperation work in Central Asia towards and beyond 2014? @ Permanent Representation of the Republic of Poland to the European Union
The seminar aims to bring together experts and policy-makers from both sides of the Atlantic to discuss the connecting points and divergences of policies of the European Union and the U.S. in Central Asia. Both have similar – though not identical – interests and objectives inCentral Asia but their policy-approaches differ substantially. What can be done in terms of cooperation and coordination in the light of the NATO draw-down from Afghanistan and how can both partners cooperate in Central Asia post-2014?

During the seminar EUCAM will also present its latest Working Paper: The Afghanistan-Central Asia relationship: what role for the EU?