Events Calendar

May
7
Tue
2013
What’s Wrong in the Relationship Between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan? @ Voesar Conference Room
May 7 @ 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
What's Wrong in the Relationship Between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan? @ Voesar Conference Room
with Volker Jacoby, Former Human Rights OfficerUN Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia 
 
Volker Jacoby will shed light on the uneasy relationship between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan and put it into the broader regional context of Central Asia. He will talk about the water/energy nexus in the region and the struggle over the Rogun Hydropower station project in Tajikistan, the conflict over the Farhad water reservoir, TALCO, border delimitation, railroad connections and other strains between the two neighbors. He will also elaborate on necessity and prospects of cooperation in the region, with a view also towards the withdrawal of international combat forces from Afghanistan.
May
14
Thu
2015
“My Andijon Remains”: Memory and Forgetting Ten Years after the Andijon Events @ Voesar Conference Room
May 14 @ 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
"My Andijon Remains": Memory and Forgetting Ten Years after the Andijon Events @ Voesar Conference Room
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Lunch event featuring:

Laura Adams, USAID and Harvard University

Sarah Kendzior, Al Jazeera and CAP Associate

Noah Tucker, Registan.net and CAP Associate

Steve Swerdlow, Human Rights Watch[/vc_column_text][vc_button title=”Uzbekistan’s Forgotten Massacre, New York Times, by Sarah Kendzior” target=”_self” color=”btn-warning” icon=”none” size=”wpb_regularsize” href=”http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/13/opinion/uzbekistans-forgotten-massacre.html?_r=0″][vc_column_text]

The 13 May 2005 Andijon violence has been documented, interpreted and remembered by survivors, by society and by the state in ways that have evolved over the ten years since it occurred. While responses to the violence and the drive by survivors to document their firsthand experiences helped expand the Uzbek-language internet in an important way made possible by new technologies, rapid technological change and the shift to social media erased many of those discussions and firsthand narratives without deliberate censorship or action by the state. The state itself has at times promoted memory of the events — memory of specific versions — and other times, particularly after the Arab Spring, preferred to forget they occurred as it attempts to promote a narrative that Uzbekistan is synonymous with “peace and stability [tinchlik va osoyishtalik].” The panelists will discuss how all these processes have evolved in the decade since the violence and how technological change shapes the way tragic events are remembered — and forgotten — in the age of social media.

[/vc_column_text][vc_button title=”Please RSVP” target=”_blank” color=”btn-warning” icon=”none” size=”btn-large” href=”http://go.gwu.edu/Andijon” el_class=”align-center”][/vc_column][/vc_row]