Events Calendar

Nov
1
Thu
2012
Merging Eurasian Insights with the Study of Afghanistan
Nov 1 – Nov 4 all-day
Merging Eurasian Insights with the Study of Afghanistan

THE EURASIA PROGRAM of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the Central Asia Program at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies atGeorge Washington University are pleased to announce a field development workshop, to be held on the GWU campus November 1-4, 2012.

ELIGIBILITY
Applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents and currently either within five years of the completionof their dissertation, enrolled in an accredited PhD program, or enrolled in an area studies MA program.Applicants should have an identified and developed research project that relates to the theme and focus of theworkshop. Preference will be given to those developing their dissertation.
Full instructions on how to apply can be found on the program’s website: http://www.ssrc.org/programs/pages/eurasia-program/crossing-boundaries-merging-eurasian-insights-with-the-study-of-afghanistan/ 
Application materials should be submitted electronically to the SSRC Eurasia Program at [email protected] by5:00 p.m. EDT on October 1, 2012.  Travel costs, workshop meals, and accommodation for participants will becovered by the SSRC. Should you have any questions, please contact the Eurasia Program ([email protected]).

Nov
2
Fri
2012
Extractive Politics, Trust Deficit & Uncertainty in Afghanistan and Central Asia @ Conference Room 505
Nov 2 @ 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Extractive Politics, Trust Deficit & Uncertainty in Afghanistan and Central Asia @ Conference Room 505

with Nazif Shahrani, Professor, Indiana University-Bloomington

In the framework of the SSRC Eurasian Program’s Workshop “Crossing Boundaries: Merging Eurasian Insights with the Study of Afghanistan” the Central Asia Program is proud to host Nazif Sharhani, Professor of Central Eurasian Studies and Anthropology at Indiana University-Bloomington.
  
In his presentation Professor Sharhani will discuss the following key questions: What are the most persistent challenges facing Afghanistan and Central Asian republics to over come economic stagnation, increasing poverty, inequality, oppression, radicalism, and terrorism, dependency on outside powers and looming instability and uncertainty in the region? How will the US & NATO withdrawal of combat forces from Afghanistan in 2014 affect political stability in the region? What are the prospects for averting further uncertainty and instability within the region any time soon?
Nov
8
Thu
2012
Nomadic Life Styles and Narratives in Kazakhstan: Then and Now @ Lindner Commons
Nov 8 @ 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Nomadic Life Styles and Narratives in Kazakhstan: Then and Now @ Lindner Commons

A workshop held in conjunction with the exhibition Nomads and Networks: The Ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan” currently at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in the Smithsonian Institution until December 2, 2012.

Nomadism has been a key aspect of culture in the Eurasian space, especially on the Kazakh steppes, throughout the centuries. The Russian colonization and the Soviet Union drastically transformed the Kazakh society in the 19th and 20th century. Since independence in 1991, the legacy of nomadism has been rehabilitated by the political authorities in their nation building schemes.

The society has also participated in reconstructing symbols of the nomadic past: they have become objects of memory and research, but also objects of artistic inspiration, and commercial branding. This workshop invites a team of experts to discuss the contemporary use of the concept of nomadism from various angles.