Events Calendar

May
17
Thu
2012
Afghanistan’s Stability and Regional Security Implications for Central Asia @ Dushanbe, Tajikistan
May 17 @ 9:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Afghanistan's Stability and Regional Security Implications for Central Asia @ Dushanbe, Tajikistan
A conference organized by the Central Asia Program (George Washington University), and EUCAM (Europe-Central Asia Monitoring),with the support of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Program.

Afghanistan’s Stability and Regional Security Implications for Central Asia 

Jun
21
Thu
2012
Border Security Assistance in Central Asia: Implications for Post-2014 Afghanistan @ Voesar Conference Room
Jun 21 @ 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Border Security Assistance in Central Asia: Implications for Post-2014 Afghanistan @ Voesar Conference Room
with George Gavrilis, Executive Director,The Hollings Center for International Dialogue
A discussion of Central Asia’s Border Woes & the Impact of International Assistance
Occasional Paper Series, Central Eurasia Project, Open Society Foundations
Please join us for a discussion on border security assistance in Central Asia and its implications for the 2014 U.S. and NATO drawdown in Afghanistan. Over the last decade, the states of Central Asia have hosted a number of international programs
designed to overhaul, equip, and reform the region’s border control practices aimed at making the borders more secure and
more open  more secure against threats such as narco trafficking and crossborder extremism and more open to licit civilian crossings and lucrative trade flows.Dr. Gavrilis will assess programs funded by the United States, European Union, United Nations, and other sponsors; discuss the accomplishments and limits that these programs face on the ground, particularly in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan; and present recommendations for policymakers and the donor community as they prepare for a major change in the security environment in neighboring Afghanistan.
George Gavrilis is Executive Director of the Hollings Center for International Dialogue, a nongovernment organization with offices in Washington, D.C., and Istanbul.  He is author of The Dynamics of Interstate Boundaries (Cambridge University Press,2010), which examines how border guards, state officials, and local populations affect border security in new states. He has travelled extensively in Central Asia and the Middle East and has published articles on Afghanistan, the Central Asian republics, Iran, Israel, Turkey, and the West Bank in Foreign AffairsThe Washington Quarterly, and other forums for policy analysis and discussion. He received his PhD in political science from Columbia University and served as an assistant professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas, Austin. In 200809, he was an international affairs fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations and spent his fellowship working with the United Nations on policy initiatives forCentral Asia and Afghanistan.
Iranian Religious Presence in the Republic of Azerbaijan: Roots, Forms and Security Implications @ Conference Room 505
Jun 21 @ 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Iranian Religious Presence in the Republic of Azerbaijan: Roots, Forms and Security Implications @ Conference Room 505

with Fuad Aliyev

Fulbright Scholar at the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University
Iranian religious influence in Azerbaijan has recently become a ‘hot’ topic. However, there is little insiderknowledge, or data-based analysis of the situation on the ground. Is Iran indeed capable of usingreligious activists as its fifth column in the Republic of Azerbaijan? How are Iran-backed groupsorganized and funded? What are Iran’s real threats to various Azerbaijani strategic projects?
Azerbaijan has been the subject of Iranian political interests and religious influence since the first days ofits independence. Due to the contemporary interpretations of the Shi’a principles and the way it isintertwined with the political system of post-revolutionary Iran, the relationship between the twocountries is indeed a matter of concern for Azerbaijan.
Although the Azerbaijani government has always feared Iran’s possible aspirations and capacities toinfluence its domestic affairs using the Shi’a believers as the key channel through which to exert pressure,Iranian official and semi-official organizations have been allowed to spread their version of Islamthroughout Azerbaijan. However, recent developments, public statements, “spy” and “terror” plots, massprotests, arrests in both countries, and the revival of tensions around the Iranian nuclear weaponsprogram show that the previously set lines in the relations between two countries have been crossed.Understanding the roots, forms and security implications of Iranian religious influence in Azerbaijan mayprove to be helpful in forecasting possible outcomes of this relationship.
Fuad Aliyev is a Fulbright Scholar at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced InternationalStudies’ Central Asia – Caucasus Institute. Dr. Aliyev has a Master of Arts degree in Political Sciencefrom the Central European University (Budapest, Hungary) and PhD in Economics from AzerbaijanState Economic University. Dr. Aliyev previously worked as Department Head at the FinancialMonitoring Service under the Central Bank of the Republic of Azerbaijan. He authored severalpublications on Islamic economics and finance, and Islamic activism in Central Asia and the Caucasus.
Sep
21
Fri
2012
Kyrgyzstan in Its Regional Context @ Room 214
Sep 21 @ 4:00 PM – 5:15 PM
Kyrgyzstan in Its Regional Context @ Room 214

with Asylbek Jeenbekov, Speaker of the Supreme Council of Kyrgyzstan, The Jogorku Kengesh

The George Washington University’s International Development Studies Program and Central AsiaProgram are proud to host Asylbek Jeenbekov, Speaker of the Kyrgyz Parliament, to discuss security and development issues in Kyrgyzstan and in the Central Asian region.
Oct
18
Thu
2012
Game Over? Shifting Energy Geopolitics in Central Asia
Oct 18 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
Game Over? Shifting Energy Geopolitics in Central Asia

with Michael Denison, Research Director, Control Risks 

Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Central Asia’s geopolitical salience, from inside and outside the region, has been predicated both on its oil and gas export potential and its proximity to several volatile security complexes. However, rapidly changing patterns of global supply and demand, allied to shifting perceptions of political risk, are altering both the stakes of external engagement and the region’s profile as a zone of geopolitical contestation. This seminar examines where Central Asia is likely to fit into the evolving global energy map and how these shifts might, in turn, reconfigure the region as a geo/political space.

Michael Denison is an Associate of IERES’ Central Asia Program and was formerly SpecialAdviser to the UK Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs. He is now ResearchDirector at Control Risks, London.