Events Calendar

Jun
21
Thu
2012
Border Security Assistance in Central Asia: Implications for Post-2014 Afghanistan @ Voesar Conference Room
Jun 21 @ 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Border Security Assistance in Central Asia: Implications for Post-2014 Afghanistan @ Voesar Conference Room
with George Gavrilis, Executive Director,The Hollings Center for International Dialogue
A discussion of Central Asia’s Border Woes & the Impact of International Assistance
Occasional Paper Series, Central Eurasia Project, Open Society Foundations
Please join us for a discussion on border security assistance in Central Asia and its implications for the 2014 U.S. and NATO drawdown in Afghanistan. Over the last decade, the states of Central Asia have hosted a number of international programs
designed to overhaul, equip, and reform the region’s border control practices aimed at making the borders more secure and
more open  more secure against threats such as narco trafficking and crossborder extremism and more open to licit civilian crossings and lucrative trade flows.Dr. Gavrilis will assess programs funded by the United States, European Union, United Nations, and other sponsors; discuss the accomplishments and limits that these programs face on the ground, particularly in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan; and present recommendations for policymakers and the donor community as they prepare for a major change in the security environment in neighboring Afghanistan.
George Gavrilis is Executive Director of the Hollings Center for International Dialogue, a nongovernment organization with offices in Washington, D.C., and Istanbul.  He is author of The Dynamics of Interstate Boundaries (Cambridge University Press,2010), which examines how border guards, state officials, and local populations affect border security in new states. He has travelled extensively in Central Asia and the Middle East and has published articles on Afghanistan, the Central Asian republics, Iran, Israel, Turkey, and the West Bank in Foreign AffairsThe Washington Quarterly, and other forums for policy analysis and discussion. He received his PhD in political science from Columbia University and served as an assistant professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas, Austin. In 200809, he was an international affairs fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations and spent his fellowship working with the United Nations on policy initiatives forCentral Asia and Afghanistan.
Nov
2
Fri
2012
Extractive Politics, Trust Deficit & Uncertainty in Afghanistan and Central Asia @ Conference Room 505
Nov 2 @ 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Extractive Politics, Trust Deficit & Uncertainty in Afghanistan and Central Asia @ Conference Room 505

with Nazif Shahrani, Professor, Indiana University-Bloomington

In the framework of the SSRC Eurasian Program’s Workshop “Crossing Boundaries: Merging Eurasian Insights with the Study of Afghanistan” the Central Asia Program is proud to host Nazif Sharhani, Professor of Central Eurasian Studies and Anthropology at Indiana University-Bloomington.
  
In his presentation Professor Sharhani will discuss the following key questions: What are the most persistent challenges facing Afghanistan and Central Asian republics to over come economic stagnation, increasing poverty, inequality, oppression, radicalism, and terrorism, dependency on outside powers and looming instability and uncertainty in the region? How will the US & NATO withdrawal of combat forces from Afghanistan in 2014 affect political stability in the region? What are the prospects for averting further uncertainty and instability within the region any time soon?
Mar
25
Mon
2013
The Central Asia Security Workshop @ Lindner Commons
Mar 25 @ 8:45 AM – Mar 26 @ 12:00 PM
The Central Asia Security Workshop @ Lindner Commons

NATO members are exiting from Afghanistan at different speeds, dictated by pressures from their domestic public opinions. This withdrawal has re-launched debates on the security of the Central Asian region. In the years to come, the post-2014 changes in the regional landscape will intersect with domestic evolutions including changes in political leadership, in demographics, and the end of the Soviet legacy. GW’s Central Asia Program seeks to participate in the policy debate on Central Asia by providing current research on the different sources of potential insecurity in the region.

MONDAY, MARCH 25, 2013 (8.45 am – 4 pm)
8.45 am. Registration9 am. Opening Remarks
9.15-11 am. CENTRAL ASIA IN THE AFGHAN NEIGHBORHOOD: DO WE GET IT RIGHT?
Chair: Chantal de Jonge Oudraat (SIPRI-North America) and Marlene Laruelle (George Washington University)
Deconstructing the ‘Spillover’ Narrative
Scott Radnitz (University of Washington)
Afghan Spillover Oversell: The Greater Danger of Self-Inflicted Harm in Central Asia
Georges Gavrilis (Hollings Center for International Dialogue)
The Closing of Central Asia’s Borders
Sebastien Peyrouse (George Washington University)
Drug-Trafficking: Identifying the Real Challenges
11-11.30 am. Coffee break
11.30-1.15 pm. INTERNATIONAL LAW, GOVERNANCE, AND REGULATORY DILEMMAS
Chair: Scott Radnitz (University of Washington) and Sean Roberts (George Washington University)
Dilemmas of Democratization: The Problems of Transitioning from Authoritarian Rule in Kyrgyzstan andImplications for other Countries in the Region
Eric McGlinchey (George Mason University)
My Property, your Courts: The International Litigation of Contested Central Asian Assets
Erica Marat (American University)
Regulating Private Security Companies in Central Asia
Jan Harfst (UNDP Regional Bureau for Europe and the CIS)
Effective resolution of water related issues as a crucial factor for security in Central Asia
1.15-2.15 pm. Lunch
2.15-4 pm. THE CURSE OF STABILITY IN CENTRAL ASIA?
Chair: David Abramson (State Department)Sarah Kendzior (Al Jazeera English)
The Crisis of Consistency in Uzbekistan
Gael Raballand (Institute Choiseul, Paris)
Redistribution of oil revenues in Kazakhstan: excessive expectations from the population?
Nate Schenkkan (Freedom House)
Kyrgyzstan: When Consolidation Fails
Zohra Ismail Beben (College of William and Mary)
Statecraft in Tajikistan: A blunt instrument for a fine task?
TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 (9.30-11.30 am)
9.30-11.30 am. ISLAM IN CENTRAL ASIA: RELIGION, POLITICS, MILITANCY AND NEW MEDIA
Noah Tucker (Registan.net)  
Islamic “revival” in Central Asia: Social trend or political threat?  
Nathan Barrick (Strategic consultant, CLI Solutions)
Geostrategic factors in the Islamist militant threat to central Asia
Azizullah Ghazi (Independent Scholar)
Activities of Central Asian Islamic militant organizations on the internet and social media
11.30-12 pm. Wrap up