Events Calendar

May
25
Fri
2012
Informal Justice in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan @ Lindner Commons
May 25 @ 9:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Informal Justice in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan @ Lindner Commons

with Azita Ranjbar and Dr. Eric McGlinchey

What role does informal justice play in resolving conflict in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan? Is there an inverse relationship between the use of informal justice mechanisms and properly functioning state institutions?  In Kyrgyzstan, aksakal courts (courts of elders) are village-level institutions responsible for resolving community-level disputes, although they are increasingly described as largely obsolete and only used in villages to resolve small disputes. Their authority to resolve cases is gradually diminishing;most aksakal courts surveyed received less than ten cases last year.  In Tajikistan, informal leaders,usually imams, often play a contradictory role: they often act as arbitrators and mitigate conflict within their communities and yet they oversee practices that can violate individual rights and contravene Tajik law, such as officiating marriages and divorces outside of state institutions. In recent years, the authority of informal leaders has increased because of the government’s inability to provide much needed social services, including fair and equal access to justice.
Azita Ranjbar spent a year in Tajikistan as a Fulbright Fellow and two months in Kyrgyzstan interviewing ordinary citizens on the role that informal justice plays in daily life. As an InternationalResearch and Exchanges Board research fellow, she carried out research on legal and economic challenges facing the families of migrant workers in Tajikistan. She worked as a Senior ProgramSpecialist at the U.S. Institute of Peace, on rule of law initiatives and peace building programs inAfghanistan and Pakistan. She previously conducted research in Afghanistan as a research assistant withDartmouth College and the Afghan Women Judges Association in Kabul.
Eric McGlinchey is an associate professor of government and politics at George Mason University and an associate in the Central Asia Program at The George Washington University. He received hisPh.D. from Princeton University in 2003. He is the author of Chaos, Violence, Dynasty Politics andIslam in Central Asia.
Oct
16
Tue
2012
Islam and Politics in Tajikistan: An Insider’s View @ Lindner Commons
Oct 16 @ 10:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Islam and Politics in Tajikistan: An Insider’s View @ Lindner Commons

with Muhiddin Kabiri, Chairman of the Islamic Renaissance Party of Tajikistan

Muhiddin Kabiri, Chairman of the Islamic Renaissance Party of Tajikistan, will discuss the current situation in Tajikistan including the preparation for the presidential elections in 2013, the new restrictive laws on religion, the difficulties faced by the Islamic Renaissance Party, and the tensions in the Gorno-Badakhshan region since last July.
Marlene Laruelle, Director of the Central Asia Program, will moderate.
A light lunch will be served and time will be given for a Q&A session and interaction with the public.
Mar
25
Mon
2013
The Central Asia Security Workshop @ Lindner Commons
Mar 25 @ 8:45 AM – Mar 26 @ 12:00 PM
The Central Asia Security Workshop @ Lindner Commons

NATO members are exiting from Afghanistan at different speeds, dictated by pressures from their domestic public opinions. This withdrawal has re-launched debates on the security of the Central Asian region. In the years to come, the post-2014 changes in the regional landscape will intersect with domestic evolutions including changes in political leadership, in demographics, and the end of the Soviet legacy. GW’s Central Asia Program seeks to participate in the policy debate on Central Asia by providing current research on the different sources of potential insecurity in the region.

MONDAY, MARCH 25, 2013 (8.45 am – 4 pm)
8.45 am. Registration9 am. Opening Remarks
9.15-11 am. CENTRAL ASIA IN THE AFGHAN NEIGHBORHOOD: DO WE GET IT RIGHT?
Chair: Chantal de Jonge Oudraat (SIPRI-North America) and Marlene Laruelle (George Washington University)
Deconstructing the ‘Spillover’ Narrative
Scott Radnitz (University of Washington)
Afghan Spillover Oversell: The Greater Danger of Self-Inflicted Harm in Central Asia
Georges Gavrilis (Hollings Center for International Dialogue)
The Closing of Central Asia’s Borders
Sebastien Peyrouse (George Washington University)
Drug-Trafficking: Identifying the Real Challenges
11-11.30 am. Coffee break
11.30-1.15 pm. INTERNATIONAL LAW, GOVERNANCE, AND REGULATORY DILEMMAS
Chair: Scott Radnitz (University of Washington) and Sean Roberts (George Washington University)
Dilemmas of Democratization: The Problems of Transitioning from Authoritarian Rule in Kyrgyzstan andImplications for other Countries in the Region
Eric McGlinchey (George Mason University)
My Property, your Courts: The International Litigation of Contested Central Asian Assets
Erica Marat (American University)
Regulating Private Security Companies in Central Asia
Jan Harfst (UNDP Regional Bureau for Europe and the CIS)
Effective resolution of water related issues as a crucial factor for security in Central Asia
1.15-2.15 pm. Lunch
2.15-4 pm. THE CURSE OF STABILITY IN CENTRAL ASIA?
Chair: David Abramson (State Department)Sarah Kendzior (Al Jazeera English)
The Crisis of Consistency in Uzbekistan
Gael Raballand (Institute Choiseul, Paris)
Redistribution of oil revenues in Kazakhstan: excessive expectations from the population?
Nate Schenkkan (Freedom House)
Kyrgyzstan: When Consolidation Fails
Zohra Ismail Beben (College of William and Mary)
Statecraft in Tajikistan: A blunt instrument for a fine task?
TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 (9.30-11.30 am)
9.30-11.30 am. ISLAM IN CENTRAL ASIA: RELIGION, POLITICS, MILITANCY AND NEW MEDIA
Noah Tucker (Registan.net)  
Islamic “revival” in Central Asia: Social trend or political threat?  
Nathan Barrick (Strategic consultant, CLI Solutions)
Geostrategic factors in the Islamist militant threat to central Asia
Azizullah Ghazi (Independent Scholar)
Activities of Central Asian Islamic militant organizations on the internet and social media
11.30-12 pm. Wrap up
May
7
Tue
2013
What’s Wrong in the Relationship Between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan? @ Voesar Conference Room
May 7 @ 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
What's Wrong in the Relationship Between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan? @ Voesar Conference Room
with Volker Jacoby, Former Human Rights OfficerUN Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia 
 
Volker Jacoby will shed light on the uneasy relationship between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan and put it into the broader regional context of Central Asia. He will talk about the water/energy nexus in the region and the struggle over the Rogun Hydropower station project in Tajikistan, the conflict over the Farhad water reservoir, TALCO, border delimitation, railroad connections and other strains between the two neighbors. He will also elaborate on necessity and prospects of cooperation in the region, with a view also towards the withdrawal of international combat forces from Afghanistan.