Events Calendar

Sep
12
Thu
2013
Looking Ahead: US-Central Eurasia Security Relations @ Voesar Conference Room
Sep 12 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Looking Ahead: US-Central Eurasia Security Relations @ Voesar Conference Room
Join the Central Asia Program, the Center for International Policy, and leading Eurasia analysts for a discussion on the current status of US-Central Eurasia security relations to mark the launch of theSecurity Assistance Monitor, an online resource of the United States’ defense and security relationships around the world.  The Security Assistance Monitor is a new, comprehensive online resource that provides information and answers questions about the US security and defense relationships around the world.  Formerly known as Just the Facts, a project which focused on US security assistance to Latin America, the Security Assistance Monitor is an expanded resource of searchable statistics, data, upcoming events,and related information on US security and defense priorities for Central Eurasia, the Middle East,and Africa. 
Oct
17
Thu
2013
Beyond Pakistan: New Delhi’s Policy Toward Afghanistan and Central Asia @ Voesar Conference Room
Oct 17 @ 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Beyond Pakistan: New Delhi's Policy Toward Afghanistan and Central Asia @ Voesar Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the Rising Powers Initiative

with Jean-Luc Racine, Emeritus CNRS Senior Fellow,School for Advanced Studies in Social Sciences, Paris
Dr. Jean-Luc Racine is Emeritus CNRS Senior Fellow, working at the Centre for South AsianStudies, at the School for Advanced Studies in Social Sciences (EHESS), Paris. He is also theDirector of the Science Policy at the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, and Vice-President of the Paris-based think tank Asia Centre (www.centreasia.eu). His research is focused onthree correlated issues: the dynamics of transformation of contemporary India; India’s foreignand security policies and its attempts at reshaping the new world order; and geopolitics of SouthAsia, particularly its most sensitive issues: Pakistan strategic paradigm, India-Pakistan relations andKashmir.
Nov
21
Fri
2014
Re-imagining “post-Soviet” Central Asia: The role of the GCC and articulating geopolitical identities through capital cities. @ Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
Nov 21 @ 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM
Re-imagining “post-Soviet” Central Asia: The role of the GCC and articulating geopolitical identities through capital cities. @ Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412 | Washington | District of Columbia | United States
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]With Natalie Koch,Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University

In the newly independent states of Central Asia, geopolitical practices and affinities cannot be understood in isolation from their Soviet heritage. However, after nearly 25 years since the collapse of the USSR, this near-automatic explanation of contemporary politics in terms of Soviet legacies is no longer sufficient for understanding Central Asia’s shifting geopolitics. In this paper, I analyze how geopolitical identities are narrated through urban development schemes in Astana, Baku, and Ashgabat – and in particular how they are increasingly connected to new flows of actors, ideas, and finance from the states of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). Adopting a critical geopolitics approach, I compare and contrast elements of these capital city development schemes in Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, and Turkmenistan with those in Qatar, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Through this comparative analysis, I demonstrate how region-making and geopolitical orientations unfold not just at the level of rhetorical positioning, but can also develop through the material practices of cross-regional networks around highly specific political tactics, like capital city development. Also considering divergences, I note that although the urban landscapes these tactics materialize are very similar, there are important differences in the underlying political geographic and political economic factors that makes them possible, as well as the political relations they sustain and produce.

[/vc_column_text][vc_button title=”Please RSVP” target=”_self” color=”btn-warning” icon=”none” size=”btn-large” href=”http://go.gwu.edu/gcc” el_class=”align-center”][/vc_column][/vc_row]
Feb
19
Thu
2015
Religion, Sta​te and Secularism in Eurasia… and Beyond @ Conference Room 505
Feb 19 @ 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Religion, Sta​te and Secularism in Eurasia… and Beyond @ Conference Room 505
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

This seminar will explore state-sponsored secularism in the Eurasian continent, and how the authorities use the concept of the separation of state and religion to consolidate authoritarian policies. It looks at Russia, Central Asia and China, comparing them with the Middle-East. In the name of state secularism, Islamic communities are prohibited from interfering in politics, while the state strictly monitors religious activities, and interactions with the rest of the Ummah are looked upon with suspicion.

4:00pm Presentations

Alexsey Malashenko (Carnegie Moscow)

Sean Roberts (GWU)

Nader Hashemi (University of Denver)

5:15pm Discussion[/vc_column_text][vc_button title=”Please RSVP” target=”_self” color=”btn-warning” icon=”none” size=”btn-large” href=”http://go.gwu.edu/religion” el_class=”align-center”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Feb
23
Mon
2015
Syria Calling: Migration, Mobilization and the Transformation of the Central Asian Jihad @ Conference Room 505
Feb 23 @ 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Syria Calling: Migration, Mobilization and the Transformation of the Central Asian Jihad @ Conference Room 505
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]with Eileen O’Connor, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs

and Noah Tucker, Registan.net

Key points:
 Perhaps surprisingly, ISIS appears to be weak in its resources for online recruit-ing in Central Asian languages, but benefits disproportionately and in some un-intended ways from this resentment because of the ubiquity of its brand. Theevidence available through social media research conducted by this projectwould support and argument that there are several hundred Uzbek militantsparticipating in ISIS, but not larger numbers recently suggested by other report-
ing and Central Asian security services.
 Central Asians who support or are interested in ISIL appear to mostly be youngmigrant laborers who have little or no background in Islam as a religion butembrace Islam as an identity that offers solidarity, a sense of belonging and anexplanation for economic hardship and discrimination that they experience.
 Much of the discourse inside especially ISIS sympathizer circles among migrantlaborers in Russia builds not on religion, but resentment – and a resentmentstoked by the uniquely toxic media environment that has developed on Russia-based social networks filled with false information. 
[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]
This discussion is off the record.
This event is co-sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science  (POMEPS) at the George Washington University. 
[/vc_column_text][vc_button title=”Please RSVP” target=”_self” color=”btn-warning” icon=”none” size=”btn-large” href=”http://go.gwu.edu/Syria” el_class=”align-center”][/vc_column][/vc_row]