Events Calendar

Mar
5
Tue
2013
Understanding Conflict and Ethnic Violence in Kyrgyzstan
Mar 5 @ 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Understanding Conflict and Ethnic Violence in Kyrgyzstan

with Neil Melvin, Director of Program Armed Conflict and Conflict Management, SIPRI

Over the last two decades, Kyrgyzstan has experienced two major outbreaks of violence involving the main ethnic communities in the country: the Kyrgyz and the Uzbeks. These violent incidentshave generally been viewed as ethnic conflicts and much of the response to the violence from thegovernment, local communities, and the international community has been framed within thisunderstanding. At the same time, Kyrgyzstan has also experienced other, less significant violent events and political crises that have often been linked temporally to the “ethnic conflicts”. This suggests that a full understanding of the nature of armed conflict in Kyrgyzstan and the involvement of ethnic communities in violence at a minimum requires a broader examination of the context of the violence. Neil Melvin is director of Program Armed Conflict and Conflict Management at the StockholmInternational Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), and has also worked at a variety of leading policy institutes in Europe. 

Aug
28
Wed
2013
The Inaugural Central Asia Fellowship Seminar @ Alumni House
Aug 28 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
The Inaugural Central Asia Fellowship Seminar @ Alumni House
4:00 pm. Registration
4.15pm. Welcome Chantal de Jonge Oudraat, Executive Director, SIPRI-North America
 
4:30-6:00 pm. Fellows Presentations and Discussion:
Aitolkyn Kourmanova, Central Asia Fellow (Kazakhstan)
Regional Cooperation in Central Asia: Nurturing from the Ground
Safovudin Jaborov, Central Asia Fellow (Tajikistan)
Radicalization of Youth in Tajikistan: Causes, Consequences, and Addressing the Challenges
Discussants:
Ross Wilson, Director, Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center, Atlantic Council 
Sanaam Naraghi-Anderlini Co-Founder of International Civil Society Action Network(ICAN), and Senior Fellow, MIT Center for International Studies
Chair: Marlene Laruelle, Director, Central Asia Program, GWU
6:00 pm. Reception
Dec
16
Mon
2013
The Second Central Asia Fellowship Seminar @ Lindner Commons
Dec 16 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
BagishbekovYevgeniya Pak

The Central Asia Program and SIPRI North America have the pleasure to invite you to the Second Central Asia Fellowship Seminar. The seminar will be followed by a reception.

With
Sardar Bagishbekov, Central Asia Fellow (Kyrgyzstan)
Ensuring Freedom from State Violence in the Kyrgyz Republic
Yevgeniya Pak, Central Asia Fellow (Uzbekistan)
Exit Visa Regime in Uzbekistan: Regime Interests versus Freedom of Individuals
Discussants:
Erica Marat, Visiting Scholar, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Eric Lohr, Director of Initiative for Russian Culture, American University
Mar
25
Tue
2014
Are US strategic interests in Azerbaijan at risk? @ Voesar Conference Room
Mar 25 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Are US strategic interests in Azerbaijan at risk? @ Voesar Conference Room

with Dr. Farhad Aliyev, Central Asia-Caucasus Institute

The current US policy of disengagement from Southern Eurasia may have  a negative impact upon the US strategic interests in the region in the long-run, with Azerbaijan becoming more vulnerable to falling under Russia’s influence and having to manage a difficult relationship to Iran. Moreover, domestic evolutions are on their way: roll back in democratization and the influence of changes in values among the youth, especially under the influence of Turkey’s internal changes, may make the US position in the country more difficult.
May
30
Fri
2014
Myth and Rhetoric of the Turkish Model: Changing notions of marginality in Turkey
May 30 @ 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Myth and Rhetoric of the Turkish Model: Changing notions of marginality in Turkey

with Anita Sengupta, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad Institute of Asian Studies, Kolkata, India 

The Turkish Model or the Turkish Developmental Alternative was promoted in the Central Asian Republics immediately following the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The Model emphasised the ideal of a ”secular, democratic, liberal society”as a model for the post- Soviet Turkic world and in the process encouraged a”Turkic” rhetoric that emphasized connection between the two regions based on acommon ancestry. While Turkey was presented as ‘’the’’ model of development fora vast region there was also the emergence of a critique of this ‘’modern’’ model from within the state itself particularly in terms of how the Turkish state continued to exclude certain groups from its definition of who constitutes its “relevant’’citizen. Gezi Park and subsequent events within Turkey have brought into questionthe democratic credentials of the state. This presentation questions the myth andrhetoric of a model that emerges in the face of transitions and recedes asalternatives emerge from within.