Events Calendar

Mar
25
Mon
2013
The Central Asia Security Workshop @ Lindner Commons
Mar 25 @ 8:45 AM – Mar 26 @ 12:00 PM
The Central Asia Security Workshop @ Lindner Commons

NATO members are exiting from Afghanistan at different speeds, dictated by pressures from their domestic public opinions. This withdrawal has re-launched debates on the security of the Central Asian region. In the years to come, the post-2014 changes in the regional landscape will intersect with domestic evolutions including changes in political leadership, in demographics, and the end of the Soviet legacy. GW’s Central Asia Program seeks to participate in the policy debate on Central Asia by providing current research on the different sources of potential insecurity in the region.

MONDAY, MARCH 25, 2013 (8.45 am – 4 pm)
8.45 am. Registration9 am. Opening Remarks
9.15-11 am. CENTRAL ASIA IN THE AFGHAN NEIGHBORHOOD: DO WE GET IT RIGHT?
Chair: Chantal de Jonge Oudraat (SIPRI-North America) and Marlene Laruelle (George Washington University)
Deconstructing the ‘Spillover’ Narrative
Scott Radnitz (University of Washington)
Afghan Spillover Oversell: The Greater Danger of Self-Inflicted Harm in Central Asia
Georges Gavrilis (Hollings Center for International Dialogue)
The Closing of Central Asia’s Borders
Sebastien Peyrouse (George Washington University)
Drug-Trafficking: Identifying the Real Challenges
11-11.30 am. Coffee break
11.30-1.15 pm. INTERNATIONAL LAW, GOVERNANCE, AND REGULATORY DILEMMAS
Chair: Scott Radnitz (University of Washington) and Sean Roberts (George Washington University)
Dilemmas of Democratization: The Problems of Transitioning from Authoritarian Rule in Kyrgyzstan andImplications for other Countries in the Region
Eric McGlinchey (George Mason University)
My Property, your Courts: The International Litigation of Contested Central Asian Assets
Erica Marat (American University)
Regulating Private Security Companies in Central Asia
Jan Harfst (UNDP Regional Bureau for Europe and the CIS)
Effective resolution of water related issues as a crucial factor for security in Central Asia
1.15-2.15 pm. Lunch
2.15-4 pm. THE CURSE OF STABILITY IN CENTRAL ASIA?
Chair: David Abramson (State Department)Sarah Kendzior (Al Jazeera English)
The Crisis of Consistency in Uzbekistan
Gael Raballand (Institute Choiseul, Paris)
Redistribution of oil revenues in Kazakhstan: excessive expectations from the population?
Nate Schenkkan (Freedom House)
Kyrgyzstan: When Consolidation Fails
Zohra Ismail Beben (College of William and Mary)
Statecraft in Tajikistan: A blunt instrument for a fine task?
TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 (9.30-11.30 am)
9.30-11.30 am. ISLAM IN CENTRAL ASIA: RELIGION, POLITICS, MILITANCY AND NEW MEDIA
Noah Tucker (Registan.net)  
Islamic “revival” in Central Asia: Social trend or political threat?  
Nathan Barrick (Strategic consultant, CLI Solutions)
Geostrategic factors in the Islamist militant threat to central Asia
Azizullah Ghazi (Independent Scholar)
Activities of Central Asian Islamic militant organizations on the internet and social media
11.30-12 pm. Wrap up
Apr
2
Wed
2014
Diversified Development: Making the Most of Natural Resources in Eurasia
Apr 2 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Diversified Development: Making the Most of Natural Resources in Eurasia
with, Ivailo Izvorski, The World Bank
Economic development discussions in Eurasia often become debates about diversification. For aregion that is resource-rich, this is to be expected. Eurasian economies have in many ways become less diversified during the last two decades. At the same time, people are much better off today thanthey were in the 1990s: poverty has been cut in half, incomes have increased fivefold; and educationand health have improved. Eurasia’s economies have also become more integrated with the globaleconomy and more productive at home. And the region has also become better at efficientlyconverting natural wealth into productive capital: since the mid-2000s it has built more in assets thanthe mineral wealth it has used up.  But most countries in Eurasia have yet to learn the main lessonfrom the experience of resource rich countries in other parts of the world. In brief, what distinguishessuccess from failure are the institutions used to manage economic volatility, ensure high qualityeducation, and provide a competition regime that levels the playing field for enterprise. Developmentsuccess in resource-rich economies comes from more diversified asset portfolios–a better balancebetween natural resources, built capital, and economic institutions. “DiversifiedDevelopment” elaborates on these lessons and provides practical recommendations for twelve countries in the former Soviet Union.
Dec
1
Mon
2014
Police in Afghanistan: Continuing the Mission and Defining the Future @ Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
Dec 1 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Police in Afghanistan: Continuing the Mission and Defining the Future @ Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]with Major General Masood Ahmad Azizi, MoI Deputy Minister for Strategy and Policy

  • Police are the long-term security solution to targeting the enablers of insurgency and criminals
  • Securing the public’s trust by the police is essential to defeating insurgents
  • Securing and retaining the public’s trust requires continued police professionalization
[/vc_column_text][vc_button title=”Please RSVP” target=”_self” color=”btn-warning” icon=”none” size=”btn-large” href=”http://go.gwu.edu/Azizi” el_class=”align-center”][/vc_column][/vc_row]
May
18
Mon
2015
Turkmenistan: Domestic Evolution, Economic Development, and Regional Environment @ Conference Room 505
May 18 @ 9:00 AM – 5:30 PM
Turkmenistan: Domestic Evolution, Economic Development, and Regional Environment @ Conference Room 505
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]9:00am Introductory Remarks

Marlene Laruelle (CAP, IERES, GWU)

9:15am Session I. Governance Changes in Turkmenistan

Chair: Marlene Laruelle (CAP, IERES, GWU)

Myles Smith (IREX)
Forget political will – Would good governance even be possible in Turkmenistan?

Chris Miller (USAID)
Governance Challenges and Opportunities in Turkmenistan

Discussion

​​10:45-11:15pm Coffee-break

11:15-12:45pm Session II. Economic Development, Progress and Challenges

Chair: Victoria Clement (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA)

Theresa Sabonis-Helf (National Defense University)
Casting a Wider Net: Turkmenistan and Regional Electricity

Jan Šír (Charles University, Prague)
Going Private? Denationalization and Privatization in Turkmenistan under Berdymukhammedov

Kenyon Weaver (Dentons LLP)
The Transformation of Commercial Law under President Berdymuhamedov.

12:45-1:30pm Lunch

1:30-3:00pm Session III. Turkmenistan in its Regional Environment

Chair: Myles Smith (IREX)

Nazik Muradova (Central Asia Fellow, GWU)
Revisiting Turkmenistan’s energy exports. Path toward a greater diversity of foreign partners?

Slavomir Horák (Charles University, Prague)
Turkmenistan-Uzbekistan. From personal approach to ordinary authoritarian regimes relations?

Sebastien Peyrouse (Central Asia Program, GWU)
Turkmenistan-Afghanistan: Political Pragmatism, Security Tensions?

​​3:00-3:15pm Coffee-break

3:15-4:45pm Session IV. Historical and Social Transformations

Chair: Sebastien Peyrouse (Central Asia Program, GWU)

Victoria Clement (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA)
Intrepid Reformers: Turkmen Jadids

Aynabat Yaylymova (Turkmenistan Health Initiative)
Reproductive Health: How do I say this in Turkmen?

Jahan Taganova (Syracuse University)
Image of Turkmen Girls Online[/vc_column_text][vc_button title=”Please RSVP” target=”_blank” color=”btn-warning” icon=”none” size=”btn-large” href=”http://go.gwu.edu/turkmen” el_class=”align-center”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row]