Events Calendar

Apr
2
Wed
2014
Diversified Development: Making the Most of Natural Resources in Eurasia
Apr 2 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Diversified Development: Making the Most of Natural Resources in Eurasia
with, Ivailo Izvorski, The World Bank
Economic development discussions in Eurasia often become debates about diversification. For aregion that is resource-rich, this is to be expected. Eurasian economies have in many ways become less diversified during the last two decades. At the same time, people are much better off today thanthey were in the 1990s: poverty has been cut in half, incomes have increased fivefold; and educationand health have improved. Eurasia’s economies have also become more integrated with the globaleconomy and more productive at home. And the region has also become better at efficientlyconverting natural wealth into productive capital: since the mid-2000s it has built more in assets thanthe mineral wealth it has used up.  But most countries in Eurasia have yet to learn the main lessonfrom the experience of resource rich countries in other parts of the world. In brief, what distinguishessuccess from failure are the institutions used to manage economic volatility, ensure high qualityeducation, and provide a competition regime that levels the playing field for enterprise. Developmentsuccess in resource-rich economies comes from more diversified asset portfolios–a better balancebetween natural resources, built capital, and economic institutions. “DiversifiedDevelopment” elaborates on these lessons and provides practical recommendations for twelve countries in the former Soviet Union.
Feb
24
Tue
2015
Deciphering Eurasianism in Hungary: Narratives, Networks, and Lifestyles @ Voesar Conference Room
Feb 24 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Deciphering Eurasianism in Hungary: Narratives, Networks, and Lifestyles @ Voesar Conference Room
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with Umut Korkut, Glasgow Caledonia University

Since the outbreak of the global financial crisis, the Hungarian right engaged in a collective soul searching on what formulates Hungarian identity. Dr. Korkut’s paper elaborates on the discourses of the Hungarian conservative and radical right-wing political and intellectual coalitions that Hungarians in terms of their language, culture, and identity fit better with Eurasia imagined as a geographic and a geopolitical entity.

Dr. Umut Korkut is a Reader in Politics at Glasgow School for Business and Society at Glasgow Caledonian University. He was been admitted to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy with magna cum laude at the Central European University in Budapest in 2004. He was awarded the “Doçent” title by the Turkish High Education Authority in 2009. His current research focus is broadly social policy, liberalization, religion and gender rights, migration, democratization and Europeanization in Central and Eastern Europe and Turkey. He will be a visiting fellow at Slavic and Russian Studies Centre at University of Hokkaido from June to September 2015.

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