Events Calendar

Mar
23
Thu
2017
Cinema Club Film Screening: Little Angel, Make Me Happy (Turkmenistan, 1993) @ Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
Mar 23 @ 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Directed by Usman Saparov

This film “tells an intimate story within the larger historical context of the deportation of ethnic Germans from Turkmenistan to Siberia during the Second World War. Saparov’s historical narrative touches on one of the most complex questions for the modern ‘little person,’ the question of ‘motherland’. The film received Grand Prizes at six international festivals, and many other awards.” [http://events.stanford.edu/events/269/26983/]

Please RSVP.

Apr
20
Thu
2017
Cinema Club Film Screening: “The Gift to Stalin” (Kazakhstan, 2008) @ Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
Apr 20 @ 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
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Directed by Rustem Abdrashev

“Set in 1949, just before Stalin’s 70th-birthday jubilee, the film centers on Sasha (Dalen Shintemirov), a 9-year-old boy who escapes from a train transporting Jewish refugees from Moscow to Kazakhstan.

“Hidden among the shrouded corpses callously dumped on the tracks, Sasha is rescued by an aging railway worker (Nurzhuman Ikhtimbaev) and taken to his tiny village. There, in an ethnic melting pot of other exiles, he is cared for by Vera (Yekaterina Rednikova), an earthy Russian, and Yezhik (Waldemar Szczepaniak), a shy, thoughtful Pole.” – JEANNETTE CATSOULIS, The New York Times

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May
4
Thu
2017
Cinema Club Film Screening: “Two Horses of Genghis Khan” (Mongolia, 2009) @ Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
May 4 @ 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
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Directed by Byambasuren Davaa

“Two Horses presents a stiff look at the crushing after-effects on Mongolian heritage in the years following the Chinese cultural revolution, in which priceless artifacts of music and art were destroyed, including the family heirloom of this story’s protagonist – a nineteenth century horse head violin engraved with the words of an old and largely forgotten Mongolian folk song.

“Unlike almost any other song, the verses of the song after which the film is titled embody the history and paradigm change of the Mongolian people. For singer Urna Chahar Tugchi, the song becomes the touchstone of her cultural identity after making a promise to her late grandmother to bring the family’s old horse head violin back to the homeland. Her grandmother was forced to destroy the beloved violin in the tumult of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, and now only the head and neck remain intact, along with a few of the verses of the folk song that were engraved on the neck. With the dark days of the revolution now past, it is time to fulfill the promise.” – Corinth Films

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May
10
Wed
2017
Social Cohesion in Kyrgyzstan @ Voesar Conference Room
May 10 @ 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Social cohesion has emerged over the last two decades as an important concept in both academic and political discourse, especially in fragile and conflict-affected environments. At the same time, the evidence on how to build social cohesion and peace at the individual level has been quite scarce. This event will review some exciting new evidence on building peace and social cohesion at the micro-level from Central Asia.

Drawing on the results of the Life In Kyrgyzstan Study, a long-term quantitative study of socio-economic developments of over 8.000 individuals, Prof. Tilman Brück will present some insights on social cohesion and peace in Kyrgyzstan since 2010.

Dr. Kanat Tilekeyev will explore findings from the Kyrgyz Social Cohesion Through Community-Based Development Project, discussing the motivation and design of the project; development of the social cohesion index; and findings from operations and implications for future community-driven development programming in conflict-affected and fragile environments.

Dr. Damir Esenaliev will present the findings from the impact evaluation of the LivingSidebySide® (LSBS) peacebuilding programme designed to foster ethnic tolerance and skills for resolving conflict among young adults in Southern Kyrgyzstan.

Professor Tilman Brück is Director of the ISDC – International Security and Development Center. His research interests focus on the economics of household behaviour and well-being in conflict-affected and fragile economies, including the measurement of violence and conflict in household surveys and the impact evaluation of programs in conflict-affected areas.

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Dr. Damir Esenaliev is a Senior Researcher with SIPRI’s Peace and Development Programme. His recent research focuses on impact evaluation of peacebuilding interventions in Kyrgyzstan and on quantitative microeconomic research related to labour markets, welfare, inequality, intergenerational mobility and governance. 

Dr. Kanat Tilekeyev is a Senior Research Fellow of the Institute of Public Policy and Administration, University of Central Asia. He has extensive experience in research on agricultural economics, trade, business development, policy impact evaluation and microeconomic studies of the countries of Central Asia at projects of the World Bank, USAID, FAO and other donor and research organizations.
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May
11
Thu
2017
Victoria Kim – Re-visiting the 1937 Deportation of Ethnic Koreans to Central Asia + Film Screening of “Koryo Saram The Unreliable People”
May 11 @ 4:30 PM – 8:00 PM
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Re-visiting the 1937 Deportation of Ethnic Koreans to Central Asia:  80 Years of Survival and Prospering

Followed by a screening of Koryo Saram The Unreliable People

 

The year 2017 marks the 80th anniversary of the first deportation of an entire nationality in the Soviet Union. In 1937, approximately 172,000 ethnic Koreans – the entire population of Posyet Korean national district and neighboring territories in the Far Eastern Krai – were forcefully relocated to Central Asia on cargo trains by the Soviet government. Eighty years later, their descendants still live in independent Russia, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Some of them view the deportation as a tragedy whereas others see it quite differently.

Victoria Kim will discuss the changing narrative of the 1937 deportation and focus on the process of re-definition of the Korean identity currently taking place across Central Asia.

Victoria Kim holds an MA from the Johns Hopkins University’s SAIS in Korean Studies and MA from the University of Bolton in International Multimedia Journalism. Originally from Tashkent, Uzbekistan, she is currently based in Beijing, China, as a researcher and documentary storyteller. She is the author of Lost and Found in Uzbekistan: The Korean Story. Her multimedia long-reads, podcast and seminars on the Korean diaspora in the former Soviet Union are featured in The Diplomat and by the Korea Economic Institute of America, Royal Asiatic Society, and etc.

 

Koryo Saram The Unreliable People

Koryo Saram The Unreliable People tells the harrowing saga of survival in the open steppe country and the sweep of Soviet history through the eyes of Koryo Saram – the deported Koreans – who were labeled by Stalin as enemies of the state. Through rare archival footage and personal interviews, the film follows the deportees’ unique history of integration into the Soviet system while working under punishing conditions in Kazakhstan, a true melting pot of exiled people from all over the Soviet Union.

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